Thank you for stopping by! We have launched our partnership with Climate Partner and we need your help to decided on the project to invest once we have calculated our CO2 emission of our products. Below we have outlined and explained what each project is about. And you can vote using the poll below.

We look very much forward to hearing from you! And any questions, as always please feel free to contact us.

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1. CO2 compensation through regional humus build-up – GERMANY

Lively, fertile soils are the basis for healthy food and clean the groundwater. They form the foundation for us humans and for a species-rich flora and fauna. Our goal is to make our soil naturally more fertile again by building up humus. More and more agricultural companies are continuously participating in our humus-building program and thus actively contribute to climate protection.

With the build-up of humus, CO2 is extracted from the atmosphere and fed into the soil. This makes our floors one of the most powerful natural CO2 stores. The humus content is regularly measured and documented. The participating farmers receive extensive support and ensure long-term CO2 storage. The project contributes to the turnaround in agriculture and to increasing biodiversity in agriculture.

Please read the German version here: https://fpm.climatepartner.com/project/details/1204/en

2. Access to clean drinking water – UGANDA

The Improved Kitchen Regimes program runs activities in various Least Developed Countries. In Uganda, the project reduces greenhouse gas emissions by installing and repairing boreholes. This allows people to access clean drinking water without having to boil it, which is the common way of purifying contaminated water. Many existing boreholes are no longer functional. Reaching the next source of safe water often means long walking distances, taking a lot of people’s time and energy. Other projects in the program reduce CO2-emissions by distributing clean cookstoves. Compared to traditional cooking methods, these save large amounts of firewood, causing less smoke and carbon emissions. The project’s main benefit besides protecting the climate is improving people’s health situation.

Water-borne diseases are the second biggest killer of children under the age of five in Subsaharan Africa. Another big threat is air pollution from cooking on open fire, leading to severe respiratory diseases or eye infections. The project tackles both issues and saves carbon emissions.

More information on here: https://fpm.climatepartner.com/project/details/1092/en

3. Qori Q’oncha – Microsol Improved Cookstoves – PERU

Each year, more than 4 million people, among the poorest in the world, die from exposure to toxicfumes from the use of inefficient, polluting and hazardous traditional three stones fire. The ones first affected by severe respiratory and eye diseases are women and young children.

In response to this alarming situation, Microsol developed the Qori Q’oncha program that works for over 10 years and supports the dissemination and sustainability of more than 100,000 improved cookstoves in poor rural areas of Peru. It was the first Programme of Activities registered with the Gold Standard quality label. Currently Qori Q’oncha is the most advanced in the world: 106,056 improved cookstoves have been installed and it benefits 493,277 persons living in poverty. It has generated three carbon credits issuances, corresponding to USD 5.5 million given to the partners for the sustainability of their projects. It currently includes projects of 6 projects developers in nine regions of Peru: Piura, Cajamarca, La Libertad, Huánuco, Cusco, Huancavelica, Arequipa, Moquegua y Tacna.

More information on here: https://fpm.climatepartner.com/project/details/1092/en

4. Protecting a threatened piece of the Amazon – PERU

The Madre de Dios region is part of the Vilcabamba-Amboró Corridor, one of the largest areas with the highest biodiversity in the world. In addition to endangered species such as the mahogany tree, jaguar, puma, howler monkeys, macaws and the boa, several indigenous, sometimes uncontacted peoples also live here. However, their valuable habitat is threatened by the Transamazônica road construction project across Brazil and Peru. This favours immigration into the ecologically sensitive area and associated developments such as agriculture and livestock breeding.

This leads to massive deforestation, as can be seen from the finished part of the road in Brazil. Numerous resistances, e.g. from environmental and indigenous groups, have so far prevented the completion of the Peruvian section.

Since 2009, our climate protection project has been protecting an area of 100,000 hectares and helping local communities to manage it sustainably.

How does forest protection help fight global warming?

Forests are not only among the planet’s most important carbon reservoirs. They also are home to an enormous diversity of species and are the livelihood for all people. However, global forest areas have declined sharply in recent decades due to increasing settlement, agricultural use, illegal logging and mining.

Forest protection projects ensure that forests are preserved in the long term and that the protection of forests is given a higher value than their deforestation. Together with the local population, project participants protect the area from negative influences. To allow for this the projects create alternative sources of income and educational opportunities. Depending on the project region, forests store varying amounts of carbon per hectare. Particularly high amounts of carbon are stored in the vegetation and soil of tropical swamp forests, primary rainforests or mangroves.

More information on here: https://fpm.climatepartner.com/project/details/1057/en

5. Keeping plastic waste from entering the oceans – GLOBALLY

Over 8 million tonnes of plastic waste surge into the ocean each year – the equivalent of a dump truck’s worth per minute. Plastic will probably outweigh fish in the ocean by 2050.

Plastic Bank offers a root-cause solution to ocean plastic. Especially in developing nations, the lack of disposal infrastructure and greater dependency on single use packaging result in a disproportionate amount of pollution. Plastic Bank provides income opportunities to the extremely impoverished, currently operating in Haiti, Indonesia, and the Philippines. People can collect plastic from their environment and bring it to their local Plastic Bank branch in exchange for money, fresh food, clean water, cellular service, cooking oil, or even school tuition for their children. Collectors are paid a premium in addition to the market plastic value, which ensures a liveable income. Collected plastic is recycled and processed into new raw material feedstock, called Social Plastic, which can be purchased by manufacturers to produce more environmentally and socially ethical products. This completes the plastic loop, creating a sustainable, circular economy.

How do clean oceans contribute to climate protection?

The ocean stores a quarter of the CO2 from the atmosphere and even 93.4 percent of the heat caused by the greenhouse effect – making it a major brake on climate change. Warming, overfishing, pollutants and waste endanger this balancing function. The Plastic Bank prevents plastic waste from entering the sea and thus indirectly protects the climate. Because there are no certified emission reductions, ClimatePartner supports the Plastic Bank in combination with a Gold Standard climate protection project, a wind farm in the Philippines: www.climatepartner.com/1091. With every ton of CO2 we compensate 10 kg of plastic waste.

More information on here: https://fpm.climatepartner.com/project/details/1057/en

6. The rainforest as a basis of existence – PAPUA NEW GUINEA

Since time immemorial, the people in the primeval forest of April Salumei, Papua New Guinea, have lived in harmony with nature. Until the government approved its area for industrial use and deforestation, that is. The basis of their own existence was facing destruction. The indigenous people joined forces and fought on behalf of their forest. Today, they protect a vast area of pristine rainforest, with countless species of birds, exotic animals and plants. They thus maintain an important CO2 sink.

The project brings other benefits for them: today, the children go to school, learn to read, and have prospects for the future. Adults are able to find work in small businesses. Anyone who falls ill can be treated in a health centre in the next village. All this is new and only made possible through the financing arising from the carbon offset project.

How does forest protection help fight global warming?

Forests are not only among the planet’s most important carbon reservoirs. They also are home to an enormous diversity of species and are the livelihood for all people. However, global forest areas have declined sharply in recent decades due to increasing settlement, agricultural use, illegal logging and mining.

Forest protection projects ensure that forests are preserved in the long term and that the protection of forests is given a higher value than their deforestation. Together with the local population, project participants protect the area from negative influences. To allow for this the projects create alternative sources of income and educational opportunities. Depending on the project region, forests store varying amounts of carbon per hectare. Particularly high amounts of carbon are stored in the vegetation and soil of tropical swamp forests, primary rainforests or mangroves.

More information on here: https://fpm.climatepartner.com/project/details/1032/en

Beitrag zu den UN-Zielen für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDGs) // Contribution to the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

1. Keine Armut // No Poverty. 
2. Kein Hunger.  // No hunger. 
3. Gesundheit und Wohlergehen. // Good Health and Well-Being. 
4. Hochwertige Bildung.  // Quality Education. Financial support, scholarships and solar lamps for schools. 
5. Geschlechtergleichheit. // Gender Equality. 
6. Sauberes Wasser und Sanitäreinrichtungen.  // Clean water and sanitation. 
7.  Erschwingliche und saubere Energie. // Affordable and Clean Energy. 
8. Menschenwürdige Arbeit und Wirtschaftswachstum.  // Decent Work and Economic Growth. 
9. Industrie, Innovation, Infrastruktur. // Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure 
10. Reduzierte Ungleichungen. // Reduced Inequalities.
12. Nachhaltige/r Konsum und Produktion. // Sustainable consumption and production. 
13. Maßnahmen zum Klimaschutz.  // Climate Action. 
15. Leben an Land.  // Life on land. 
16. Frieden, Gerechtigkeit und Starke Institutionen. // Peace, justice and strong institutions
17. Ziele von Partnerschaften. // Partnerships for the Goals.