What are Cacay Oil’s benefit? Is Cacay Oil comedogenic? How is it different from Argan Oil? What is Cacay’s oil shelf-life?

As so many of you asked us if we can provide more information around Cacay Oil, we decided to start a series. The objective of the series is to outline some of the major differences when it comes to some of the most popular ingredients that you are hearing about at the moment in the beauty industry. Or referred to as the superfood and must-have ingredients.

In the first series, we will be looking at Cacay Oil vs Argan Oil. We will outline some of the similarities, some differences and Cacay Oil properties vs Argan Oil.

Introduction: Cacay Oil vs Argan Oil

Cacay Oil is still a very unknown oil in the industry. Even though it is starting to become known among some beauty bloggers, experts. Overall, in comparison to some others such as Argan, Marula, and other beautiful oils that is almost in everyone’s beauty shelf.

So let’s get started.

Linoleic Acid: Cacay Oil vs Argan Oil

Cacay is a wonderful oil as it is high in Linoleic Acid (Omega 6). Cacay Oil can contain more than 70% of Linoleic acid.You can review the results of our Oil on our Green Science page. Due to its high level of Linoleic Acid, it makes it a very good oil for all types of skin including blemish prone skin or people that suffer from acne. Due to recent studies, it has been identified the reason why some suffer from blemish or acne is due to their deficiency in linoleic acid which helps to reduce inflammation and decongest pores.  Thus, Cacay Oil being extremely high in Linoleic Acid is suitable for all skin types. In comparison to Argan, Argan Oil has around 30% – 40%, Cacay is much higher. Each of our batches gets tested so that we can ensure that Linoleic acid remains high.

Oleic Acid: Cacay Oils vs Argan Oil

Most people prone to breakouts are actually lacking Linoleic Acid in their sebum, the skin’s natural oils, and instead have an overabundance of Oleic Acid, a Omega-9 fatty acid that helps the skin lock in and retain moisture but can easily get trapped in pores when not properly balanced with Linoleic Acid. Oleic Acid is quite rich, often leading to excess oil for people with acne-prone skin, Linoleic Acid is much thinner and lighter, and therefore suitable for those with oily/acne-prone skin. Oleic Acid (Omega 9) can be found in Argan in high-levels around 40%-50%, in comparison to Cacay, where it is around 10%-14%. If you tend to have normal to dry skin, you can use oils rich in Oleic acid. However, if you tend to have combination to oily skin, you should consider oils are high in Linoleic Acid such as our Cacay Oil.

Vitamin E: Cacay Oil vs Argan Oil

Both oils, Cacay and Argan Oil are rich in Vitamin E. The four tocopherols—alpha, beta, gamma, delta—are the most common forms of vitamin E. Each tocopherol contains unique benefits that allow our skin to effectively retain moisture and protect itself against environmental pollution.When looking at Vitamin E, you can see the results of our tests below on the left. And we found some generic results of Argan on the right. Overall, Cacay and Argan are not hugely different apart from Cacay containing higher levels of alpha-tocopherol and we couldn’t outline any beta-tocopherol in Cacay while Argan Oil shows traces.

Cacay Oil

Argan Oil

Vitamin E (Tocopherol)

alpha-tocopherol

16.06%

4.0 – 9.0 %

beta-tocopherol

0.1 – 0.3 %

gamma-tocopherol

76.45%

80 – 90 %

delta-tocopherol

7.48%

5.0 – 10.2 %

Source: Naya Skincare Ltd (c)

Alpha (α) Tocopherol

Alpha (α) — Thanks to its easy absorption, permeating both the epidermis and the dermis, alpha-tocopherol is the most popular form of vitamin E in skin care products. Soothing and moisturizing, alpha-tocopherol helps protect against the harmful effects of UV rays while fighting free radicals. Some studies also show that it blocks the enzymes that break down elastin—a powerful protein that contributes to our skin’s youthfulness and elasticity. Alpha-tocopherol is often used in eye creams, moisturizing hair products, and anti-aging products.

Production: Cacay Oil vs Argan Oil

Argan Oil has been around for the last 10 years. While Cacay Oil only has been re-discovered the last few years. Revenues from the global market for argan oil are estimated to exceed US$ 6,000 Mn by 2022-end. And it is expected to grow at a CAGR of 20.03% during the period 2018-2022. When it comes to production of argan oil, the global argan oil market was 4,835.5 tons in 2014. And is expected to reach 19,622.5 tons by 2022. Growing at a CAGR of 19.6% from 2015 to 2022. With the cosmetics segment as the leading application segment. And it is expected to show significant growth in the coming years. When you compare this to Cacay Oil, the numbers are far smaller with only approx 2-3 tons being produced per year due to it still being a beauty secret among the insiders.

Conclusion

Both oils are beautiful and it is based on your skin needs.  To us, it is important to not only produce high-quality and effective skincare products to transform one skin at a time. At NAYA, #sustainabilitymatters  It is important to look back where and how we source our ingredients from and use in our meticulously formulated products. It is about being transparent and invest into communities and not into plantations, mass produced ingredients. And that makes us different and unique. We work directly with farmers to source the Cacay oil we are using in our products. Our farmers use organic fertilisers, pick cacay nuts from mature trees from the prime forest – thus making our Cacay Oil unique as it is community-sourced and sustainable! We urge you to search out those companies that work hand in hand with their producers instead of feeding a vicious circle. 

Try our own Cacay oil in our Everyday Face Oil to see the benefits in action. As our customers say ‘Love at first try’ ! 


References

1. Ottaviani, M., Camera, E., and Picardo, M. (2010), “Lipid Mediators in Acne”, Published in Mediators Inflammation.
Published online 2010 Aug 25. doi: 10.1155/2010/858176. Available on: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2943135/
2. Guillaume, D., PhD; Charrouf, Z., PhD, (2011) “Argan Oil “, Available on: http://www.altmedrev.com/archive/publications/16/3/275.pdf
3.Prof. Piérard Department of Dermatopathology, CHU Sart Tilman,(2002),”Digital image analysis of the effect of topically applied linoleic acid on acne microcomedones”, Available on: https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2230.1998.00315.x
Available online: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1046/j.1365-2230.1998.00315.x